Sackler Family Boasted In ’90s That Oxycontin ‘Prescription Blizzard’ Would Be ‘Deep, Dense & White’

Information Liberation

Chris Menahan

Jan. 15, 2019

A member of the Oxycontin-manufacturing Sackler family said at the launch party for the drug in the 1990’s that the coming “prescription blizzard” would be “deep, dense and white,” according to a bombshell court filing by the Massachusetts Attorney General.

From the AP:

A member of the family that owns OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma told people at the prescription opioid painkiller’s launch party in the 1990s that it would be “followed by a blizzard of prescriptions that will bury the competition,” according to court documents filed Tuesday.

The details were made public in a case brought by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey that accuses Purdue Pharma, its executives and members of the Sackler family of deceiving patients and doctors about the risks of opioids and pushing prescribers to keep patients on the drug longer. The documents provide information about former Purdue Pharma President Richard Sackler’s role in overseeing sales of OxyContin that hasn’t been public before.

[…]According to the filing, Richard Sackler, then senior vice president responsible for sales, told the audience at the launch party to imagine a series of natural disasters: an earthquake, volcanic eruption, hurricane and blizzard.

“The launch of OxyContin Tablets will be followed by a blizzard of prescriptions that will bury the competition. The prescription blizzard will be so deep, dense, and white,” he said, according to the documents.

“Over the next twenty years, the Sacklers made Richard’s boast come true,” lawyers in the attorney general’s office wrote. “They created a manmade disaster. Their blizzard of dangerous prescriptions buried children and parents and grandparents across Massachusetts, and the burials continue,” they wrote.

There’s no question it’s very “white.”

The complaint says the Sackler family, which includes major donors to museums including the Smithsonian Institution, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Tate Modern in London, was long aware its drug was dangerous and addictive but pushed more sales anyway.

A memo among family members in 2008 warned of a “dangerous concentration of risk” for the family, the complaint says. Years earlier, Richard Sackler wrote in an email that the company would have to “hammer on the abusers in every way possible,” describing them as “the culprits and the problem.”

Here’s some excerpts from the full filing (if you don’t have time to read them all, read 174, 175, 183 and 204):

All the evidence suggests this was a criminal conspiracy. Everyone involved should be brought up on charges and their wealth should be confiscated to repay the families of their millions of victims.

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