Word Play Wednesday – 12/12/18

SUN v SON

sun (n.)

Old English sunne “the sun,” from Proto-Germanic *sunno (source also of Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German sunna, Middle Dutch sonne, Dutch zon, German Sonne, Gothic sunno “the sun”), from PIE *s(u)wen-, alternative form of root *sawel- “the sun.”

*sawel-

*sāwel-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning “the sun.” According to Watkins, the *-el- in it originally was a suffix, and there was an alternative form *s(u)wen-, with suffix *-en-, hence the two forms represented by Latin sol, English sun.

It forms all or part of: anthelion; aphelion; girasole; heliacal; helio-; heliotrope; helium; insolate; insolation; parasol; parhelion; perihelion; Sol; solar; solarium; solstice; south; southern; sun; Sunday.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit suryah, Avestan hvar “sun, light, heavens;” Greek hēlios; Latin sol “the sun, sunlight;” Lithuanian saulė, Old Church Slavonic slunice; Gothic sauil, Old English sol “sun;” Old English swegl “sky, heavens, the sun;” Welsh haul, Old Cornish heuul, Breton heol “sun;” Old Irish suil “eye;” Avestan xueng “sun;” Old Irish fur-sunnud “lighting up;” Old English sunne German Sonne, Gothic sunno “the sun.”

son (n.)

Old English sunu “son, descendant,” from Proto-Germanic *sunus (source also of Old Saxon and Old Frisian sunu, Old Norse sonr, Danish søn, Swedish son, Middle Dutch sone, Dutch zoon, Old High German sunu, German Sohn, Gothic sunus “son”). The Germanic words are from PIE *su(e)-nu- “son” (source also of Sanskrit sunus, Greek huios, Avestan hunush, Armenian ustr, Lithuanian sūnus, Old Church Slavonic synu, Russian and Polish syn “son”), a derived noun from root *seue- (1) “to give birth” (source also of Sanskrit sauti “gives birth,” Old Irish suth “birth, offspring”).

SOURCE: https://www.etymonline.com/

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